9 Facts You Didn't Know About Disney Parks

9 Facts You Didn't Know About Disney Parks

Think you've covered the entire Disneyland park in Florida? You probably might need a second visit to spot these hidden gems!

It's all about perspective...

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Cinderella Castle gives a really massive and towering vibe particularly because of its use of forced perspective in its architecture and its rather subtle incline. Fun fact: the structure is actually built higher than the rest of the park.

Hidden basketball court

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A hidden single-hoop basketball court was built at the top of the 147-foot mountain of the circa 1959 Matterhorn Bobsleds especially for Disney's employees! As the roller coaster makes use of only the bottom two-thirds of the mountain, it makes sense to place the court at the peak in order to fill the void.

A hidden club in Disneyland has an 18-year waiting list

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Club 33 is a prestigious hidden gem located in Disneyland’s New Orleans Square.

Look for a particular door near Blue Bayou restaurant that says "33", but don't expect much as you need a reservation to be able to enter the premises.

There’s reportedly an 18-year waiting list and $10,000 initiation fee to get in. It is the only such place within Disneyland itself where alcohol is allowed.

Where The Beatles bid farewell

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The Beatles officially broke up at Disney’s Polynesian Resort. While on vacation there on December 29, 1974, John Lennon signed the papers confirming their break-up. Ouch!

French fry oil as fuel

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The steam engines of the Disneyland Railroad run on old French fry oil. After a few days’ use in kitchens throughout the park, waste oil is stored in tanks and then shipped off-site to be converted to a biodiesel the trains can run on. Every time guests order fries, they’re helping to reuse 200,000 gallons of fuel a year.

Most of Magic Kingdom is actually the roof of a two-storey building

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The corridors beneath Magic Kingdom is wide enough to admit vehicles and holds wardrobe, break rooms, and the Digital Animation Control System (DACS) – that serves as the nerve center for the park’s effects – from the currents of the flume rides to the soundtrack of the Haunted Mansion. Some 30 hidden stairwells and elevators connect it with the “upstairs” of the park.

Disco Yeti

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When the Expedition Everest opened in 2006, the largest audio-animatronic Yeti had a problem functioning and it lunged menacingly at every passing train and had to be turned off due to the high intensity.

Parade floats

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The floats in Disney’s signature parades stay on track and in sync with the help of quarter-sized sensors embedded in the pavement.

Magic whip?

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Timothy Q. Mouse, who presides over Dumbo the Flying Elephant (Magic Kingdom and Disneyland), once brandished a training whip to make the elephants soar. Times changed, and the whip was quietly replaced with a “magic feather.”

Sources: The Walt Disney Company, Travel and Leisure
Image credit: 
Travel and Leisure

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